Annotated Bibliography Example - APA, MLA, Chicago Styles

annotated bibliography example

An annotated bibliography example is a useful tool for teaching students about the fundamentals and mechanics of an annotated bibliography.

Many people are unfamiliar with it, but they may learn something from a bibliography annotation lesson.

The instructions in this blog will help you construct a well-described and documented annotated bibliography.

You'll learn how to begin, format, and finish it correctly so that you can fulfill the requirements of the assignment.

Let’s get started!

An annotated bibliography is a structured list of sources with a detailed explanation. The first portion is a simple citation, and the remainder is about 150-200 words in length.

The length of the annotation will be determined by your teacher's requirements.

Many students believe that an annotation is the same as an abstract. There's a significant difference between annotations and abstracts because they're not the same thing.

The abstract is a descriptive summary that appears at the start of a scientific publication and journal entries.

The annotations are more critical and descriptive. Later in the article, we'll discuss the distinctions between them.

Examples of Annotated Bibliography

When it comes to annotated bibliographies, there are a number of styles that are more popular than others. The most frequently used MLA, APA, and Chicago formats are preferred by students.

It does not imply that other forms like AAA, IEEE, Harvard, or Oxford are neglected; it is dependent on the instructions your instructor has given you and your field of study. Certain types of styles are only utilized by students enrolled in particular courses.

Annotated Bibliography Example - APA Style

The most popular annotated bibliography style is APA.

If your instructor hasn't specified any style, APA is a safe choice.

Students frequently believe that the APA writing style and bibliography are simple. In general, all bibliographies are quite simple to understand, it is just a question of comprehending them.

The first thing to consider when creating an annotated bibliography according to APA style is the citation. Make certain that the link of the journal, book, or article you utilize is formatted in APA style.

After you've completed all the necessary citations, create an indented paragraph that summarizes what's mentioned in the citation or source. The following are some sample annotations according to APA style.

Brent, S. (2013). The origins of agriculture in the Lowlands of Mesoamerica. Journal of ethnobiology, 33(1), 188-206.

This article discusses the origins of agriculture in the lowlands of Mesoamerica. Brent provides an overview of the current literature on the topic and argues that the current evidence suggests that agriculture originated in multiple regions simultaneously.

This article is well-written and provides a comprehensive overview of the current literature on the origins of agriculture in the lowlands of Mesoamerica. It is useful for anyone interested in learning more about this topic.

Griggs, B. (2011). The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study: The largest public health study you've never heard of—and why you should care. ACEs Too High.

This article discusses the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES), which is the largest public health study ever conducted.

Griggs provides an overview of the study and argues that it is important for everyone to know about the findings of the study because they have implications for both individual and public health.

This article is well-written and provides a comprehensive overview of the ACES study.

Piper, J. (2013). The effects of early-life stress on cognitive and emotional development. Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, 34(2), 125-133.

This article discusses the effects of early-life stress on cognitive and emotional development. Piper provides an overview of the current literature on the topic and argues that early-life stress can have negative consequences for both cognitive and emotional development.

This article is well-written and provides an overview of the current literature on the effects of early-life stress.

Diaz, J. (2013). The impact of immigration on mental health. American Journal of Public Health, 103(2), 254-262.

This article discusses the impact of immigration on mental health. Diaz provides an overview of the current literature on the topic and argues that immigrants are at risk of developing a variety of mental health problems.

This article is well-written and provides a comprehensive overview of the current literature on the impact of immigration on mental health.

Wilkinson, L. (2012). The role of fathers in child development. Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, 33(5), 344-351.

This article discusses the role of fathers in child development. Wilkinson provides an overview of the current literature on the topic and argues that fathers play a critical role in the development of their children.

This article is well-written and provides a comprehensive overview of the current literature on the role of fathers in child development.

Annotated Bibliography Example - MLA Style

The main difference between the APA format and the MLA format is in the citation. The annotation component will remain intact. A better way to express this is by providing examples. MLA-annotated bibliography examples are given below;

"The Dangers of Binge Drinking." Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 29.2 (2005): 245-248.

This article provides detailed information on the dangers of binge drinking, specifically discussing how it can lead to health problems such as liver disease and brain damage. The author also includes personal anecdotes to illustrate the dangers of binge drinking.

I found this article to be helpful in understanding the risks associated with binge drinking. It is well-written and easy to understand, and it provides a lot of useful information.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Excessive Alcohol Use." Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 61.35 (2012): 745-750.

This report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides statistics on alcohol misuse in the United States, including information on binge drinking, alcohol-related deaths, and the economic costs of excessive alcohol use.

The CDC report is very useful for understanding the extent of the problem of alcohol misuse in the United States.

Hingson, Ralph W., et al. "Magnitude of Alcohol-Attributable Fatalities and Years of Potential Life Lost in the United States." Journal of Studies on Alcohol 62.1 (2001): 43-51.

This article presents information on the number of alcohol-related deaths in the United States and the years of life that are lost as a result. The authors use data from several different sources to calculate these estimates.

This article is very useful to understand the extent of the problem of alcohol-related deaths in the United States.

The length of the paper is determined by your instructor's word count requirement.

Annotated Bibliography Example - Chicago Style

The main shift in the Chicago style annotated bibliography is the citation style, which is also consistent with APA and MLA. The annotation is quite similar to the one described above.

Below is a Chicago style annotated bibliography example:

Garrow, David J. Protest at Selma: Martin Luther King and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978.

Garrow explains how Martin Luther King, Jr.'s and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's (SCLC) use of protest helped to shape the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

He claims that Selma's position as a site for civil rights protests and SCLC'S particular measures in Selma were part of a strategy to generate national voting rights legislation.

The primary objective of this struggle was to elicit "unprovoked white violence aimed at peaceful and unresisting civil rights demonstrators." Garrow claims that as a result of Selma, the earlier strategy of nonviolent provocation took precedence.

The SCLC correctly predicted that police violence would be front-page news in every newspaper and on television all across the country, as well as in Washington.

Lopez, Adriana. "The Politics of Memory: Testimony and Silence in Contemporary Chile." Poetics Today, vol. 33, no. 2, 2012, pp. 307-328.

This article discusses how silence and testimony are used in order to shape memory and create political narratives in contemporary Chile.

The author provides a thorough analysis of three case studies in order to illustrate her points. This is an interesting article that would be useful for anyone studying memory and politics.

Garcia, Cristina. "Negotiating Diaspora: Cubans in Spain." Centro Journal, vol. 24, no. 2, 2012, pp. 260-282.

This article examines the experience of Cubans living in Spain and how they negotiate their identity as diasporans.

The author uses case studies to explore how Cubans create new cultural spaces and associations in order to maintain their ties to Cuba. This is an interesting article that would be useful for anyone studying diaspora or migration.

Milner, Catherine. "Living with the Dead: Ancestral Memory and Mortuary Ritual in a Contemporary South African Community." Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, vol. 18, no. 2, 2012, pp. 322-343.

This article discusses how ancestral memory and mortuary ritual are used to construct identity and community in a contemporary South African community.

The author provides a detailed analysis of two case studies in order to illustrate her points. This is an interesting article that would be useful for anyone studying memory, identity, or community building.

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How to Write an Annotated Bibliography?

Creating an annotated bibliography necessitates the use of a number of intellectual abilities. This job will need you to do informed library research while also delivering proper analysis and explanation of the chosen sources.

You begin by selecting and downloading all of your sources. It's a never-ending process of going back over, referencing, and noting each source you've discovered.

  1. 1. Choose Your Sources

    The first step is to find and document any citations to books, periodicals, or papers that may contain useful information or suggestions on your topic. To get you started, try Google Scholar.

    Examine and review the actual items. Then pick those essays that give a range of viewpoints on your issue. If you're looking at web pages, save the site's location and annotate it later using a tool like Hypothesis.

  2. 2. Review Your Items

    Second, go through the things you've gathered in your search. Once you have all of your documents, it's easier to skim through them to see general themes. This also helps determine whether you should continue looking for additional topics or themes.

    After this initial review, go through and annotate each item in your collection. If you're saving all of your PDFs to Google Drive, you can use MetaPDF to mark them up and highlight them.

  3. 3. Write the Citation

    Third, when writing your annotated bibliography, use the correct style of citation for each source in a Google Doc. You can use Google Docs to save and submit your work. It's simple to start up a new Google Doc and begin with your annotated bibliography.

    The publication's style will most likely differ from the one you're using. If this is an essay, you'll get this information from your professor. From Purdue OWL and other online resources, you may learn more about APA and MLA.

  4. 4. Write the Annotation

    Fourth, produce a succinct commentary that summarizes the book or article's major theme and scope. Include one or more sentences that summarize;

    1. (a) determine the author's authority or background,
    2. (b) the implied target audience of your essay is clear,
    3. (c) consider or contrast this work with another that you've mentioned,
    4. (d) show how this research contributes to your bibliography theme,
    5. (e) identify and highlight the material's distinctive or special features,
    6. (f) description of any strong or weak aspects in the material.
    7. The reference list is arranged alphabetically in an annotated bibliography.

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Annotated Bibliography vs. Literature Review

When considering whether to write an annotated bibliography or a literature review, it is important to first understand the difference between the two. An annotated bibliography is a list of citations for sources used in a research paper or project, with a brief description of each source.

A literature review, on the other hand, is a comprehensive examination and evaluation of previously published research on a particular topic.

So, which should you write? If your goal is to demonstrate that you have read and researched a topic extensively, then you should write a literature review.

If your goal is to provide an overview of the sources that you used for a specific project, then you should write an annotated bibliography.

In a nutshell, an annotated bibliography and a literature review differ in the following ways;

Annotated Bibliography vs. Literature Review
Annotated bibliography analyzes the quality and relevance of the source. Literature review analyzes the content of the source and highlights the gaps.
All the sources are examined separately. Information gathered from different sources is analyzed together.
The respective source is mentioned at the beginning of the annotation All the sources are added and mentioned at the end of the document.
All the sources are added in alphabetical order. Relevant sources are gathered and analyzed together.

We hope that the annotated bibliography examples given in this blog will help you in working on your assignment. If you still need help, you can contact us.